About Pete

Over the past 40 years Boleslaw Lutoslawski has photographed many of the greatest figures in the arts in Europe, spanning the worlds of music, literature, dance and theatre.

Arriving in London from his native Poland in 1980, he was immediately absorbed into the capital’s fast-moving cultural scene, taking portraits of the likes of Glenda Jackson, Sir Tom Stoppard, Simon Callow, Bill Brandt, Paloma Picasso, Sir Ernst Gombrich, Sir George Martin, Helaine Blumenfeld OBE, Sir Peter Hall, Sir John Tusa, Marina Warner, Lord Richard Rogers and John Peel on assignments for The Independent, Newsweek, BBC, Vogue and Harper’s & Queen, among others. His work, however, is not constrained by time or place. And it has absolutely nothing to do with fashion. Instead, it results from a moment of special affinity, a kind of spiritual kinship, between two different personalities – the photographer and sitter.

Before becoming a portrait photographer Bo Lutoslawski studied filmmaking at Lodz Film School (1967–71) and art history at Jagiellonian University (1971-76). He has lectured on film and photography at colleges and arts centres in the UK and Poland, and his work has been exhibited and published internationally including a minted coin in 2013. In addition to his photographic works, he has published several books in Polish, most recently the autobiographical Korzenie nie znają granic, which was praised by the noted writer Ryszard Kapuscinski.

“For Bo Lutoslawski taking a portrait is like falling in love. His technique is near-telepathic inside into his subject, the way they move, the way they think – a fleeting attempt to catch their true identity”

“Powerfully baroque and quintessentially Polish photographic images …. very exciting.” – Max Wykes-Jones in Arts Review

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About Pete

Over the past 40 years Boleslaw Lutoslawski has photographed many of the greatest figures in the arts in Europe, spanning the worlds of music, literature, dance and theatre.

Arriving in London from his native Poland in 1980, he was immediately absorbed into the capital’s fast-moving cultural scene, taking portraits of the likes of Glenda Jackson, Sir Tom Stoppard, Simon Callow, Bill Brandt, Paloma Picasso, Sir Ernst Gombrich, Sir George Martin, Helaine Blumenfeld OBE, Sir Peter Hall, Sir John Tusa, Marina Warner, Lord Richard Rogers and John Peel on assignments for The Independent, Newsweek, BBC, Vogue and Harper’s & Queen, among others. His work, however, is not constrained by time or place. And it has absolutely nothing to do with fashion. Instead, it results from a moment of special affinity, a kind of spiritual kinship, between two different personalities – the photographer and sitter.

Before becoming a portrait photographer Bo Lutoslawski studied filmmaking at Lodz Film School (1967–71) and art history at Jagiellonian University (1971-76). He has lectured on film and photography at colleges and arts centres in the UK and Poland, and his work has been exhibited and published internationally including a minted coin in 2013. In addition to his photographic works, he has published several books in Polish, most recently the autobiographical Korzenie nie znają granic, which was praised by the noted writer Ryszard Kapuscinski.

“For Bo Lutoslawski taking a portrait is like falling in love. His technique is near-telepathic inside into his subject, the way they move, the way they think – a fleeting attempt to catch their true identity”
Sophie Grove

“..an evocative photographer, with images that are so haunting, conjuring up stories from another time and place” Bem Le Hunte

Max Wykes-Jones in Arts Review:

“Powerfully baroque and quintessentially Polish photographic images …. very exciting.”

As Sir John Tusa puts it, Bo Lutoslawski is a

‘photographer with a deep insight into people and character, an extraordinary honesty and a capacity to reveal the identity of his sitters’.

Richard Avedon put it even more succinctly: these are

‘beautiful and strange photographs … full of deep feeling’.

“For Bo Lutoslawski taking a portrait is like falling in love. His technique is near-telepathic inside into his subject, the way they move, the way they think – a fleeting attempt to catch their true identity”

“Powerfully baroque and quintessentially Polish photographic images …. very exciting.” – Max Wykes-Jones in Arts Review

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BBC World Service by Bo Lutoslawski

People live all over the Earth. Hundreds of millions in faraway places get up with the sunrise, while we go to sleep after a busy day, they eat supper when we eat breakfast or enjoy the warmth of budding spring, while we admire the rich colours of autumn leaves.

If you want to satisfy your curiosity about all those distant worlds, you can either travel constantly to every corner of our globe or turn to media for stories, which are told by professional journalists.

Alas, we know that some media can be like whimsical fairies, which give us illusions, stories with selectively disclosed facts. But others are true and trustworthy. You can recognize their honesty, by looking straight into their eyes, like here, at the BBC World Service

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Primrose Hill by Bo Lutoslawski

]During my first visit to London I lived for a couple of months over the bridge from Chalk Farm Tube Station, on Gloucester Avenue, close to a Regent’s Park Road with attractive, small shop and cafes leading to Primrose Hill. I loved that walk to the top of the hill, to adore the panoramic views over Regent’s Park and the city beyond, with its unbound opportunities, which, I imagined, to be dwelling in London.

For many subsequent years, I came to the same place, again and again, to revisit my dreams from that time and to create new ones – like this one with Lucy Burge, a charismatic dancer flying across Primrose Hill.

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Kew Gardens by Bo Lutoslawski

 

On a sunny, late October day I took Michael Ho, a dancer of impeccable perfection, to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, London, home to 50,000 different kinds of living plants within a thoughtfully planned environment.

Unusually, the place was almost completely deserted, giving Michael a grand stage

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Rambert Dance Company by Bo Lutoslawski

The Rambert Dance Company, Britain’s oldest dance company, since its first performances in 1926 was always at the heart of the evolution of British dance. Polish émigré and former Ballet Russes dancer Marie Rambert, who in 1914 arrived in London fleeing the outbreak of the First World War, set it up. Marie Rambert’s legendary personality inspired the development of British dance and ballet well into modern times.

This photograph of Michael Ho and members of the group, who rehearsed their steps before an evening performance, was taken at Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London, the stage on which I saw some great, contemporary dancers like Merce Cunnigham and Pina Bausch.

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

 

Waterloo Bridge by Bo Lutoslawski

 

Waterloo Bridge is bridge crossing the River Thames in London, between Blackfriars Bridge and Hungerford Bridge, named after the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This is a second bridge of this name: the first Waterloo Bridge was dismantled as it became unstable and the current Waterloo Bridge was opened in 1945.

I often worked for near-by the South Bank Centre as a free-lance photographer, had a few exhibitions there and came to many concerts at the Royal Festival Hall and plays at the National Theatre, which is close-by.

I loved walking across this bridge and stopped many times to admire the richness of townscape around me: Westminster, the South Bank, London Eye, the City of London and Canary Wharf further away. The ambience of that view changed at various times of the day and night, coloured by an unpredictability of weather and traffic.

This portrait of a dancer is my homage to the Waterloo Bridge, a passage from South to the North, from vibrant, modern culture to established theatres of Strand and beyond

Albert van Nierop at Saint Paul’s Cathedral by Bo Lutoslawski

Albert van Nierop at  St Paul’s Cathedral with the afternoon sun on our backs.  set into the façade of this magnificent church built after the Great Fire of London in the seventeenth century.

We walked up the stairs of St Paul’s Cathedral with the afternoon sun on our backs. I was going to take photographs of Albert in a secluded area, a sort of arcade, set into the façade of this magnificent church built after the Great Fire of London in the seventeenth century.

A diffused, warm light permeated the space, while sharper shafts of sunlight shone between the columns. This complex duality of light suited our ‘stage’ perfectly.

The tall, dark, heavy door behind us was locked, so we knew that our session would not be disturbed. I loaded a film into my Canon A1. Albert paced about like a tiger checking its territory. I nodded my head and pointed with a hand towards the area where I wanted him to be.

Albert took off and I watched a professional dancer at the peak of his sublime abilities flying effortlessly against the backdrop of a wall made of soft Portland stone. I asked him to jump again and again, and only then did I take the first photograph.

Guided by his dynamic movement I instinctively released the shutter.

 

Bem Le Hunte by Bo Lutoslawski

Bem Le Hunte is Associate Professor – Creative Intelligence, Course Director – Bachelor of Creative Intelligence and Innovation (BCII) at Faculty of Transdisciplinary Innovation, UTS (University of Technology Sydney)
The ancient cultures of India evolved to the rhythm of the seasons and daily routines, in a natural progression from birth to death in which each stage of life was – and still is – celebrated by rituals. At the heart of all events sitars, tablas, sarangi, bansuri, sarods are played, creating music based on ragas. These musical compositions are uniquely Indian, in that they are restraining, even prescribing, and at the same time open, so that players can improvise, feeling free in the company of other musicians.

 

Glenda Jackson by Bo Lutoslawski

 

I photographed the famous and truly great actress Glenda Jackson in her dressing room at the theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue, London, during a break between performances.

At some point, I asked her to sit in front of the mirror. A moment later she glanced at her reflection, while I watched her through the lens. Her body, her face, her eyes were so touchingly natural, because she never loses the truth of her inner soul, which dwells inside an amazing woman.

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

John Peel by Bo Lutoslawski

John Peel, a legendary music presenter on Radio One. I listened to his programmes for many years. As we know, the voices of radio presenters live in our homes and we often better know their personalities than those of our next-door neighbours. To my joy John Peel was as natural and authentic as I’d imagined. But first he apologized for being a bit late for our appointment, the reason being that he was playing football with his friends at lunchtime.

 

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St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection