About Don

Don McPhee, Guardian photographer who sadly passed away in 2007 was an assured, confident photographer who knew the route he would take, and it would be a brave picture editor who tried to change it.

Don McPhee had the reputation of a consistent, competent photographer, who, once set a challenge would go about it with thoroughness that left others in his wake.

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The catalogue of photography built by Don McPhee during his employment by the Guardian reveals Dons’ interest in people and politics.

Hic acute observations of those involved in the yearlong miners’ strike are a history lesson that need no words and his picture from Orgreave where the miners and the police fought a pitched battle has become iconic.

Don remembered the day: “Having driven over from Manchester, I missed being corralled into a pen the police had provided for the press. So, I joined the pickets and just wandered in with them and got the picture. Then I saw 30 horses galloping at me. It was like being at the wrong end of the Charge of the Light Brigade. I didn’t stop to take any more pictures – I just legged it.”

Those who worked with don McPhee refer to his comprehensive grasp and illustration of whatever challenge he was set.

In 2001 he was awarded an honorary MA from Manchester Metropolitan University and was a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, Don McPhee worked for the Guardian from 1971 to 2001

About Don

Don McPhee, Guardian photographer who sadly passed away in 2007 was an assured, confident photographer who knew the route he would take, and it would be a brave picture editor who tried to change it.

Don McPhee had the reputation of a consistent, competent photographer, who, once set a challenge would go about it with thoroughness that left others in his wake.

MORE...

The catalogue of photography built by Don McPhee during his employment by the Guardian reveals Dons’ interest in people and politics.

Hic acute observations of those involved in the yearlong miners’ strike are a history lesson that need no words and his picture from Orgreave where the miners and the police fought a pitched battle has become iconic.

Don remembered the day: “Having driven over from Manchester, I missed being corralled into a pen the police had provided for the press. So, I joined the pickets and just wandered in with them and got the picture. Then I saw 30 horses galloping at me. It was like being at the wrong end of the Charge of the Light Brigade. I didn’t stop to take any more pictures – I just legged it.”

Those who worked with don McPhee refer to his comprehensive grasp and illustration of whatever challenge he was set.

In 2001 he was awarded an honorary MA from Manchester Metropolitan University and was a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, Don McPhee worked for the Guardian from 1971 to 2001