About Reg

Reg Lancaster was employed as a staff photographer for the Daily Express for 44 years, For many of those years he was based in Scotland. Then in 1965 The Express posted Reg to Paris where he stayed until 1973.

In France it was the student population who were challenging the status quo and railing against the establishment, later to be joined by disenchanted workers. In May a series of student strikes broke out as a number of Universities in Paris and the escalating conflict ended up on the streets.

Reg was there as student protests about the government led by President Charles de Gaulle started in the early spring ’It was an absolutely incredible year’. Reg’s photographs document the riots in progress and the tension between rebellious protesters and riot police.

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During his time with the Express Reg photographed many subjects from sports and news to film and TV stars. Among the images shown here are Martin Luther King photographed by Reg on a visit to London in 1964 and Mick Jagger in Saint-Tropez in May 1971 just week before he married Bianca.

Around the world protests for civil liberties and demonstrations against the Vietnam War were happening. It was in the context of this global struggle for political democracy and personal freedom that the Paris Riots and Prague Spring took place.

Fleet Street photographer Reg Lancaster covered both ‘it was a thrilling time to be a photo journalist’

About Reg

Reg Lancaster was employed as a staff photographer for the Daily Express for 44 years, For many of those years he was based in Scotland. Then in 1965 The Express posted Reg to Paris where he stayed until 1973.

In France it was the student population who were challenging the status quo and railing against the establishment, later to be joined by disenchanted workers. In May a series of student strikes broke out as a number of Universities in Paris and the escalating conflict ended up on the streets.

Reg was there as student protests about the government led by President Charles de Gaulle started in the early spring ’It was an absolutely incredible year’. Reg’s photographs document the riots in progress and the tension between rebellious protesters and riot police.

MORE...

During his time with the Express Reg photographed many subjects from sports and news to film and TV stars. Among the images shown here are Martin Luther King photographed by Reg on a visit to London in 1964 and Mick Jagger in Saint-Tropez in May 1971 just week before he married Bianca.

Around the world protests for civil liberties and demonstrations against the Vietnam War were happening. It was in the context of this global struggle for political democracy and personal freedom that the Paris Riots and Prague Spring took place.

Fleet Street photographer Reg Lancaster covered both ‘it was a thrilling time to be a photo journalist’

Jacqueline Bisset by Reg Lancaster

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art .  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

British actress Jacqueline Bisset, photographed in the  UK on the  9th of December 1968. Bisset first came to prominence in 1968 with roles in The Detective, Bullitt and winning a Golden Globe for The Sweet Ride.  She was born in the United Kingdom on 13th September 1944. This portrait was taken by Daily Expres photographer Reg Lancaster. Lancaster photographed many subjects from sports and news to film and TV stars. He also photographed Martin Luther King when he visited London and Mick Jagger in Saint-Tropez in May 1971 just a week before he married Bianca. In 1977, Bisset gained wide publicity in America with her movie The Deep  Swimming underwater wearing only a T-shirt  for a top helped make the film a box office success, leading producer Peter Guber o quip, “That T-shirt made me a rich man!” At the time, Newsweek declared her “the most beautiful film actress of all time”

Steve McQueen At Le Mans by Reg Lancaster

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

American actor Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980) at the Le Mans trials, France, 12th April 1970. He was banned from taking part in the race for insurance reasons. (Photo by Reg Lancaster/Daily Express/Getty Images)

Mick Jagger In France by Reg Lancaster

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

English singer Mick Jagger at the wheel of his Morgan Plus 8 Roadster, outside the Hotel Byblos in Saint-Tropez, France, May 1971. He married Bianca De Macias in the town later that month. Formed in 1962 The Rolling Stones signed for Decca on 10th May 1963 following a recommendation by Beatle George Harrison. Their Blues and early rock and roll style gave them huge commercial success(Photo by Reg Lancaster/Daily Express/Getty Images

Martin Luther King In London by Reg Lancaster

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

American civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929 – 1968) at a press conference in London, September 1964.On August 28 1963 Martin Luther King made his  ‘I have a dream’ speech to a rally of over 250,000 people who marched for jobs and freedom in Washington DC.(Photo by Reg Lancaster/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Riots in Paris, 1968 by Reg Lancaster

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Policemen under attack during a demonstration in Paris, France, 7th May 1968. Protests continued for many weeks causing general unrest and civil disorder throughout France. Protests spread among workers affecting 11 million workers .(Photo by Reg Lancaster/Daily Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Getty Images Hulton Getty Reg Lancaster

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St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection