About Richard

Photojournalist Richard Lappas began his media career at the Keystone Press Agency in the heart of Fleet Street in the early 1970s as a caption writer working on Features and eventually News.

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From there he was invited to take up a post with the leading west country news and picture agency Devon News Service based in Exeter which eventually moved into Cornwall, Somerset , Dorset & Bristol

A decade later, Richard, having learnt about all aspects of editorial photography, syndication,news, features and sport, he branched out on his own and eventually built his own agency covering the south west of England.

Since the early 1980,s, Richard has won a number of prestigious awards, become a qualified University & College lecturer and written his own autobiography about his life in the national newspaper industry.

Richard frequently gives talks and lectures on news gathering as well as photo journalism. He is an active member of NAPA(National Association of Press Agencies), a member of the BAJ and works as a volunteer for the Devon Air Ambulance Trust and continues to work for a number of the national newspaper titles.

About Richard

Photojournalist Richard Lappas began his media career at the Keystone Press Agency in the heart of Fleet Street in the early 1970s as a caption writer working on Features and eventually News.

MORE...

From there he was invited to take up a post with the leading west country news and picture agency Devon News Service based in Exeter which eventually moved into Cornwall, Somerset , Dorset & Bristol

A decade later, Richard, having learnt about all aspects of editorial photography, syndication,news, features and sport, he branched out on his own and eventually built his own agency covering the south west of England.

Since the early 1980,s, Richard has won a number of prestigious awards, become a qualified University & College lecturer and written his own autobiography about his life in the national newspaper industry.

Richard frequently gives talks and lectures on news gathering as well as photo journalism. He is an active member of NAPA(National Association of Press Agencies), a member of the BAJ and works as a volunteer for the Devon Air Ambulance Trust and continues to work for a number of the national newspaper titles.

A Bloody Nose For The Prince by Richard Lappas

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

A Bloody Nose For The Prince; H.R.H. Prince Edward in training to become a Green Beret.In 1986, on leaving university, Prince Edward joined the Royal Marines who had paid £12,000 towards his tuition at Cambridge University on condition of future service.In January 1987, however, Prince Edward dropped out of the commando course after having completed just one-third of the 12-month training. Richard’s full story can be read here:

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St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection