Britain ARC Gloria by Roger Jackson

ARC Gloria the Colombian Navy’s Flagship a three-masted sail training ship passes the Thames Barrier, at Woolwich, south London, Sunday, Aug. 6, 2015 after a four day visit to the capitol. In the background buildings at Canary Wharf, and at right the O2 Arena.

  • Print Only

    From £95

    • £
    Framed / Mounted

    From £192

    • £

    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 192 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 510 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 115 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 130 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 165 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Roger Jackson

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

Blackheath Morris Men by Roger Jackson

After overnight rain and with a clearing sky Greenwich Morris Men dance at sunrise on Blackheath, south London, Monday, May 1, 2017 to celebrate May Day.The earliest performance of morris dancing in England dates from London on 19 May 1448, when Moryssh daunsers were paid 7s (35p) for their services.

By Elizabethan times it was already considered to be an ancient dance, and references appear to it in a number of early plays. Many called for a dance or jig to be performed by the leading actor. One of the most popular actors of the time was Will Kemp and, for a wager during Lent in 1599/1600 (when the roads would be exceedingly bad!), he danced from London to Norwich The Nine Daies Wonder (although he started on the first Monday in Lent, and arrived at Easter). Large numbers of spectators turned out to cheer him on and check his progress.

Throughout its history in England, morris dancing has been through many manifestations. Five hundred years ago it was a dance for one or two; today it is for four or more. Accounts of morris dancing can be found throughout England,  from .https://themorrisring.org/publications/morris-tradition.

photojournalism, buy photojournalism, buy a print, buy photography, buy a photograph, framed, charcoal frame, white frame, black frame, wall art, hang on the wall wallart, interior design, designers, interiors wall black and white, buy a gift, mothers day, fathers day, gift, present, buy Roger Jackson, buy Morris Men morris dancers, buy morris dancers DANCERS, dancers, Greenwich, Blackheath, buy Blackheath, buy south London, s.London

 

From my stint as a messenger boy I progressed through the company learning more about the mechanical process of photograph from print washing through to developing films/plates and printing pictures all the time taking pictures. An apprenticeship in all but name. If they were good enough Central Press (CP) would syndicate them for me on a 50/50 basis. At weekends I would work as a freelance photographer covering football matches and what are called media events these days. When the boss of CP, John Lacey, saw how much I was making as a freelance he gave me the opportunity to become one of their staff photographers covering everything from Royal Rota’s, politics, fashions, social events and every sort of sport. Just the sort of photograph a photo butterfly loves.

I stayed at CP until 1979 when I joined the Associated Press as a picture editor. My photography days took a back seat then as it was frowned upon for editors to be photographers as well. Strange when you consider that photographers are expected to multi task these days. Joining AP meant the chance to travel and so it was that I went to four Summer and Winter Olympics, five World Cup’s and Euro Championships plus Papal and US Presidential visits.

I retired from AP in 2009 and continue to use a camera still looking for that picture that will interest a newspaper picture desk. As an example the Viking Sea and fireworks picture was use in the Daily Telegraph across four columns this year. So by my reckoning I have been a published photographer for 55 years.

About Roger Jackson

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

Blackheath Morris Men by Roger Jackson

After overnight rain and with a clearing sky Greenwich Morris Men dance at sunrise on Blackheath, south London, Monday, May 1, 2017 to celebrate May Day.The earliest performance of morris dancing in England dates from London on 19 May 1448, when Moryssh daunsers were paid 7s (35p) for their services.

By Elizabethan times it was already considered to be an ancient dance, and references appear to it in a number of early plays. Many called for a dance or jig to be performed by the leading actor. One of the most popular actors of the time was Will Kemp and, for a wager during Lent in 1599/1600 (when the roads would be exceedingly bad!), he danced from London to Norwich The Nine Daies Wonder (although he started on the first Monday in Lent, and arrived at Easter). Large numbers of spectators turned out to cheer him on and check his progress.

Throughout its history in England, morris dancing has been through many manifestations. Five hundred years ago it was a dance for one or two; today it is for four or more. Accounts of morris dancing can be found throughout England,  from .https://themorrisring.org/publications/morris-tradition.

photojournalism, buy photojournalism, buy a print, buy photography, buy a photograph, framed, charcoal frame, white frame, black frame, wall art, hang on the wall wallart, interior design, designers, interiors wall black and white, buy a gift, mothers day, fathers day, gift, present, buy Roger Jackson, buy Morris Men morris dancers, buy morris dancers DANCERS, dancers, Greenwich, Blackheath, buy Blackheath, buy south London, s.London

 

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

From my stint as a messenger boy I progressed through the company learning more about the mechanical process of photograph from print washing through to developing films/plates and printing pictures all the time taking pictures. An apprenticeship in all but name. If they were good enough Central Press (CP) would syndicate them for me on a 50/50 basis. At weekends I would work as a freelance photographer covering football matches and what are called media events these days. When the boss of CP, John Lacey, saw how much I was making as a freelance he gave me the opportunity to become one of their staff photographers covering everything from Royal Rota’s, politics, fashions, social events and every sort of sport. Just the sort of photograph a photo butterfly loves.

I stayed at CP until 1979 when I joined the Associated Press as a picture editor. My photography days took a back seat then as it was frowned upon for editors to be photographers as well. Strange when you consider that photographers are expected to multi task these days. Joining AP meant the chance to travel and so it was that I went to four Summer and Winter Olympics, five World Cup’s and Euro Championships plus Papal and US Presidential visits.

I retired from AP in 2009 and continue to use a camera still looking for that picture that will interest a newspaper picture desk. As an example the Viking Sea and fireworks picture was use in the Daily Telegraph across four columns this year. So by my reckoning I have been a published photographer for 55 years.