Edith Piaf by Marilyn Stafford

French singer Edith Piaf ‘’The little Sparrow’’ in Paris 1950.Édith Giovanna Gassion, born in December 1915, one of France’s most beloved singer, photographed in Paris during the 1950’s. Piaf, slang for Sparrow was a nickname she received in her twenties.  Édith Piaf was a hugely successful French singer who had a colourful career which began with her father where she performed all over France as an acrobat and began her singeing career.

  • Print Only

    From £95

    • £
    Framed / Mounted

    From £192

    • £

    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 192 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 510 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 115 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 130 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 165 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Marilyn Stafford

Born in 1925 in Cleveland, Ohio, USA Marilyn Stafford’s introduction to photography was photographing Albert Einstein. From then on her career took her across the World, living first in Paris, where, with the encouragement and guidance of her friends Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson she became an internationally published photographer.

Marilyn’s work spans continents and covers a variety of subjects from street scenes, portraits, refugees and tribal peoples to international fashion.

After living and working in France, Italy, Lebanon and India she made her home in england in the mid-Sixties, where she was one of a handful of women photographers working on Fleet Fleet who paved the way for todays women in an industry once a male preserve.

In 2017 the Marilyn Stafford fotodocument award for women photographers was set up in her honour.

About Marilyn Stafford

Born in 1925 in Cleveland, Ohio, USA Marilyn Stafford’s introduction to photography was photographing Albert Einstein. From then on her career took her across the World, living first in Paris, where, with the encouragement and guidance of her friends Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Bresson she became an internationally published photographer.

Marilyn’s work spans continents and covers a variety of subjects from street scenes, portraits, refugees and tribal peoples to international fashion.

After living and working in France, Italy, Lebanon and India she made her home in england in the mid-Sixties, where she was one of a handful of women photographers working on Fleet Fleet who paved the way for todays women in an industry once a male preserve.

In 2017 the Marilyn Stafford fotodocument award for women photographers was set up in her honour.