Plane Landing On Aircraft Carrier Eagle by Herbert Mason

A Plane coming in to land on Royal Navy aircraft carrier HMS Eagle. This was an exercise to test navy equipment and clothing in severe weather conditions of the Arctic 1952.HMS Eagle was an Audacious-class aircraft carrier that served between 1951 and 1972. She was a sister ship to the Ark Royal. Laid down in 1942 Eagle and Ark Royal were two of the largest aircraft carriers built. Eagle had a crew 2500 and could carry 60 aircraft.

  • Print Only

    From £95

    • £
    Framed / Mounted

    From £192

    • £

    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 192 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 510 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 115 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 130 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 165 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Herbert Mason

Herbert Mason 1903-1964

Born in 1903 in Great Yarmouth Herbert Mason was the son of Walter Mason, who ran a photography businesses on the seafront and worked for the Yarmouth Mercury.

He joined the Daily Mail in the 1930s as a news photographer covering all types of stories.

On the night of 29 December 1940, Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason was on fire watch on the roof of Northcliffe House in Fleet Street. He captured what became the defining image of the Blitz – St. Paul’s emerging defiantly from the smoke of surrounding burning buildings. The image appeared in the Daily Mail two days later under the headline ‘St. Paul’s Stands Unharmed in the Midst of the Burning City’. Ironically, only four weeks later, the photograph was reproduced by the Berliner Illustre Zeitung who used it not to show the resilience of the blitzed city, but to show that London was burning to the ground.

Plane Landing On Aircraft Carrier Eagle by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Plane coming in to land on aircraft carrier HMS Eagle, during expedition to test navy equipment and clothing in severe weather conditions of the Arctic 1952

St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection

Piccadilly Circus 1949 by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

This beautiful atmospheric picture of an Austin Motor Car driving through Piccadilly Circus London was taken by Herbert Mason and is part of the vast Northcliffe Collection.

The Yeomen Warders of the Tower by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Halt who goes there! Chief Yeoman Warder Sergeant A.H. Cook, of the Yeomen Warders of the Tower, working by lantern light. Since 1826, at exactly seven minutes to ten at night, the Chief Yeoman Warder of the Tower emerges from the Byward Tower, wearing the traditional red Watch Coat and Tudor Bonnet. In one hand, he carries a lantern, still lit to this day with a single candle. In the other he carries a set of keys – the Queen’s Keys. He then proceeds to the ancient ceremony of locking the gates of the fortress in what has now known as The Ceremony of the Keys.

Sandstorm In Egypt by Herbert Mason

Suez Canal 1956. Two British soldiers struggle in handkerchief sand-masks in a sandstorm near the Suez Canal in Egypt. The storm is caused by the Khamsin, a warm strong, long-lasting wind from the desert. The Khamsin, Arabic for fifty, blows at intervals for about 50 days from March to June. In 1956, Suez Canal was nationalised by the Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser so Israel, the United Kingdom, and France invaded Egypt to regain Western control of the canal. This photograph is from the huge Northcliffe collection

Remains Of Guildhall by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Sir George Wilkinson the Lord Mayor of London pictured examining the remains of Guildhall. The Guildhall in London was bombed on December 29, 1940, by the German Luftwaffe. Most of the damage was caused by fire spreading from the City of London. Fire from the bombed St Jewry had drifted to the Guildhall’s roof and by ten o’ clock the Great Hall’s roof was ablaze. Thirty minutes later the building had to be abandoned. This photograph from the vast Northcliffe collection is by Herbert Mason

Angela Lansbury by Herbert Mason

 

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Actor Angela Lansbury weds fellow actor Peter Shaw in a ceremony in Knightsbridge, London in August,1949. Lansbury and Shaw remained married until his death 54 years later. Anglea Lansbury, star of the long-running Murder She Wrote was widely praised from her early days when she appeared in the film Gaslight in 1944. and with continued success in  National Velvet with Elizabeth Taylor and Dorian Gray in 1945

After the Blitz he became an official photographer in the Royal Navy sailing to Murmansk with Russian Convoys as well as Malta and Sicily.

He returned to the Mail after the war and became one of their chief photographers covering everything from the wedding of Angela Lansbury in 1949, to the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, and the conflict in Suez in 1956 as well as sporting events, fashion and the trial of Derek Bentley.

Mason worked for the Daily Mail right up to his death in 1964.

About Herbert Mason

Herbert Mason 1903-1964

Born in 1903 in Great Yarmouth Herbert Mason was the son of Walter Mason, who ran a photography businesses on the seafront and worked for the Yarmouth Mercury.

He joined the Daily Mail in the 1930s as a news photographer covering all types of stories.

On the night of 29 December 1940, Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason was on fire watch on the roof of Northcliffe House in Fleet Street. He captured what became the defining image of the Blitz – St. Paul’s emerging defiantly from the smoke of surrounding burning buildings. The image appeared in the Daily Mail two days later under the headline ‘St. Paul’s Stands Unharmed in the Midst of the Burning City’. Ironically, only four weeks later, the photograph was reproduced by the Berliner Illustre Zeitung who used it not to show the resilience of the blitzed city, but to show that London was burning to the ground.

Plane Landing On Aircraft Carrier Eagle by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Plane coming in to land on aircraft carrier HMS Eagle, during expedition to test navy equipment and clothing in severe weather conditions of the Arctic 1952

Angela Lansbury by Herbert Mason

 

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Actor Angela Lansbury weds fellow actor Peter Shaw in a ceremony in Knightsbridge, London in August,1949. Lansbury and Shaw remained married until his death 54 years later. Anglea Lansbury, star of the long-running Murder She Wrote was widely praised from her early days when she appeared in the film Gaslight in 1944. and with continued success in  National Velvet with Elizabeth Taylor and Dorian Gray in 1945

St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection

Piccadilly Circus 1949 by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

This beautiful atmospheric picture of an Austin Motor Car driving through Piccadilly Circus London was taken by Herbert Mason and is part of the vast Northcliffe Collection.

Sandstorm In Egypt by Herbert Mason

Suez Canal 1956. Two British soldiers struggle in handkerchief sand-masks in a sandstorm near the Suez Canal in Egypt. The storm is caused by the Khamsin, a warm strong, long-lasting wind from the desert. The Khamsin, Arabic for fifty, blows at intervals for about 50 days from March to June. In 1956, Suez Canal was nationalised by the Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser so Israel, the United Kingdom, and France invaded Egypt to regain Western control of the canal. This photograph is from the huge Northcliffe collection

The Yeomen Warders of the Tower by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Halt who goes there! Chief Yeoman Warder Sergeant A.H. Cook, of the Yeomen Warders of the Tower, working by lantern light. Since 1826, at exactly seven minutes to ten at night, the Chief Yeoman Warder of the Tower emerges from the Byward Tower, wearing the traditional red Watch Coat and Tudor Bonnet. In one hand, he carries a lantern, still lit to this day with a single candle. In the other he carries a set of keys – the Queen’s Keys. He then proceeds to the ancient ceremony of locking the gates of the fortress in what has now known as The Ceremony of the Keys.

Remains Of Guildhall by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Sir George Wilkinson the Lord Mayor of London pictured examining the remains of Guildhall. The Guildhall in London was bombed on December 29, 1940, by the German Luftwaffe. Most of the damage was caused by fire spreading from the City of London. Fire from the bombed St Jewry had drifted to the Guildhall’s roof and by ten o’ clock the Great Hall’s roof was ablaze. Thirty minutes later the building had to be abandoned. This photograph from the vast Northcliffe collection is by Herbert Mason

After the Blitz he became an official photographer in the Royal Navy sailing to Murmansk with Russian Convoys as well as Malta and Sicily.

He returned to the Mail after the war and became one of their chief photographers covering everything from the wedding of Angela Lansbury in 1949, to the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, and the conflict in Suez in 1956 as well as sporting events, fashion and the trial of Derek Bentley.

Mason worked for the Daily Mail right up to his death in 1964.

More Northcliffe Collection

Sir Winston Churchill from the Northcliffe Collection

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Churchill addresses the crowds from the roof of a car as he campaigned as the Liberal candidate in the Manchester North West by-election.

April 1908.Winston Churchill addresses the crowds from the roof of a car as he campaigned as the Liberal candidate in the Manchester North West by-election. Churchill lost the election to the Conservative candidate by 1261 votes. This picture is from the vast Northcliffe collection.

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Ploughing Near Lasswade from the Northcliffe Collection

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Two horses are used to plough the fields near Lasswade, Edinburgh in 1949. Snow covers the tops of the nearby Pentland Hills. Lasswade is now part of the green belt surrounding Edinburgh and popular with commuters into Edinburgh. This picture is from the vast Northcliffe collection.

Piccadilly Circus 1949 by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

This beautiful atmospheric picture of an Austin Motor Car driving through Piccadilly Circus London was taken by Herbert Mason and is part of the vast Northcliffe Collection.

Plane Landing On Aircraft Carrier Eagle by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Plane coming in to land on aircraft carrier HMS Eagle, during expedition to test navy equipment and clothing in severe weather conditions of the Arctic 1952

Upper Thames Street 1939 by from the Northcliffe Collection

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

London 28 Jun 1939. Firemen battle to extinguish the flames at the warehouse of Carron Company iron founders in Upper Thames Street.According to the companies web site, Carron Phoenix is best known for its sink manufacturing these days but can trace its roots back to 1759 when The Carron Company was founded as an iron foundry in Falkirk. The Carron Company became a manufacturing power-house, driving the industrial revolution in Scotland to a point where it employed 5000 people, operated it’s own fleet of steam ships and even issued its own currency to enable global trading.

During The Carron Company’s history, it made domestic items like flat irons, cast iron baths, range cookers and most famously the Carronade cannons used by Wellington at Waterloo. Carron Company could lay claim to a marketing first as it was the first organisation worldwide to have its name synonymous with a product, as Lord Nelson’s flagship HMS Victory, was equipped with “Carronades”. Later Carron turned its expertise to making Britain’s famous red telephone boxes and post boxes.

St. Paul’s In The Blitz by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

The Blitz: World War II: Britain: Air Raids: Fire of London. A symbol of survival.

St Paul’s Cathedral rises above the smoke and flames of one of the worst nights of bombing experienced in Britain.

On 29th December 1940 when the Thames was a low watermark and after the early bombing run had severed the water mains, the Luftwaffe’s aircraft dropped more than 10,000 incendiary bombs on the City. By some miracle, the landmark church and its dome remained untouched as thousands of firefighters and troops fought to prevent the ancient heart of London being destroyed by an inferno.

The picture was taken by Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason – it became one of the most famous images of the war. When German bombers were making one of their heaviest raids, Mason climbed to the roof of the newspaper’s headquarters Northcliffe House. With incendiaries falling around him, he watched building after building around St Paul’s ablaze. Then he caught a glimpse of the Cathedral in a momentary gap in the smoke and recorded his historic picture. This picture is one of the huge Northcliffe collection

Icicles at Thames side Wharf from the Northcliffe collection

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer .

On the 7th March 1931 a fire broke out at Butlers Wharf. Over a thousand firefighters attended the fire. The warehouse contained Tea and Rubber. It was so cold that hoses had to be wrapped in fabric and the water froze as it streamed down the walls. In this picture, we can see that Icicles surround the debris of the Thames side Wharf near Tower Bridge, which blazed for over 40 hours

Angela Lansbury by Herbert Mason

 

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Actor Angela Lansbury weds fellow actor Peter Shaw in a ceremony in Knightsbridge, London in August,1949. Lansbury and Shaw remained married until his death 54 years later. Anglea Lansbury, star of the long-running Murder She Wrote was widely praised from her early days when she appeared in the film Gaslight in 1944. and with continued success in  National Velvet with Elizabeth Taylor and Dorian Gray in 1945

Orson Welles at the Duke of York Theatre by Daily Mail

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

July 1955 :Orson Welles during rehearsals at the Duke of York Theatre ahead of the opening of his play ‘Moby Dick’ The Daily Herald’s review by Paul Holt was among those who reviews were less than flattering. He said of Welles: “He is not as deep as he thinks he is. He wears a lovely false nose and the stage effects are quite brilliant, but these, say the programme, are also by Mr Welles. Indeed, it is a one-man show aided by willing and athletic helpers. I found it all a pretentious bore.”

Remains Of Guildhall by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Sir George Wilkinson the Lord Mayor of London pictured examining the remains of Guildhall. The Guildhall in London was bombed on December 29, 1940, by the German Luftwaffe. Most of the damage was caused by fire spreading from the City of London. Fire from the bombed St Jewry had drifted to the Guildhall’s roof and by ten o’ clock the Great Hall’s roof was ablaze. Thirty minutes later the building had to be abandoned. This photograph from the vast Northcliffe collection is by Herbert Mason

Sandstorm In Egypt by Herbert Mason

Suez Canal 1956. Two British soldiers struggle in handkerchief sand-masks in a sandstorm near the Suez Canal in Egypt. The storm is caused by the Khamsin, a warm strong, long-lasting wind from the desert. The Khamsin, Arabic for fifty, blows at intervals for about 50 days from March to June. In 1956, Suez Canal was nationalised by the Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser so Israel, the United Kingdom, and France invaded Egypt to regain Western control of the canal. This photograph is from the huge Northcliffe collection

The Yeomen Warders of the Tower by Herbert Mason

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Halt who goes there! Chief Yeoman Warder Sergeant A.H. Cook, of the Yeomen Warders of the Tower, working by lantern light. Since 1826, at exactly seven minutes to ten at night, the Chief Yeoman Warder of the Tower emerges from the Byward Tower, wearing the traditional red Watch Coat and Tudor Bonnet. In one hand, he carries a lantern, still lit to this day with a single candle. In the other he carries a set of keys – the Queen’s Keys. He then proceeds to the ancient ceremony of locking the gates of the fortress in what has now known as The Ceremony of the Keys.

Parliament in the Blitz from the Northcliffe Collection

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

A photograph from the huge Northcliffe archive. The photograph taken by an unknown photographer shows the wreckage in Cloister Court caused by bombs which hit the Houses of Parliament during a twelve-hour raid on the capital by 413 German aircraft in December 1940. The building to the left of the guard is the Members’ Cloakroom. This photograph was taken on 17/12/1940 but embargoed by the war censor till 23/12/1940. limited editions of this photo can be bought from Fleet Streets Finest