Italian Landscape by Roger Taylor

Italian Landscape by Roger Taylor

  • Framed / Mounted

    From £192

    • £

    Print Only

    From £95

    • £

    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 160 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 425 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 79.166 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95.833 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 108.333 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 137.5 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Roger Taylor

I left, or was told to leave school at the age of 15, and got a job as a runner boy at the Sport and General press Agency in Gough Square off Fleet Street.

Then a Darkroom boy , then a Printer and by the age of about 19 was told I would be a photographer the next week, was in the thick of it with my MPP micro press 5×4 plate camera.

Then as years passed, the Daily and Sunday Telegraph, and did 8 years with the FT, then back and forth to Italy and Telegraph. Returned to London in 2000 and spent a year at the Dome, Millennium experience. Which enabled me to learn how to use a computer and digital cameras, it was a great job, so different, – after this back to the Telegraph, Time magazine, FT, and then settled down doing Features for Mike Spillard on the Weekend Telegraph.

I had an exhibition in Hong Kong, and one at St Pauls Cathedral which was attened by the Queen Mother. She was presented with an album of my pics, after meeting her in the Crypt where the exhibition was held.

I am now living in Italy with my wife Rhiannon, in Caprese Michelangelo, and can look out of our studio window to the house where Michelangelo was born.

About Roger Taylor

I left, or was told to leave school at the age of 15, and got a job as a runner boy at the Sport and General press Agency in Gough Square off Fleet Street.

Then a Darkroom boy , then a Printer and by the age of about 19 was told I would be a photographer the next week, was in the thick of it with my MPP micro press 5×4 plate camera.

Then as years passed, the Daily and Sunday Telegraph, and did 8 years with the FT, then back and forth to Italy and Telegraph. Returned to London in 2000 and spent a year at the Dome, Millennium experience. Which enabled me to learn how to use a computer and digital cameras, it was a great job, so different, – after this back to the Telegraph, Time magazine, FT, and then settled down doing Features for Mike Spillard on the Weekend Telegraph.

I had an exhibition in Hong Kong, and one at St Pauls Cathedral which was attened by the Queen Mother. She was presented with an album of my pics, after meeting her in the Crypt where the exhibition was held.

I am now living in Italy with my wife Rhiannon, in Caprese Michelangelo, and can look out of our studio window to the house where Michelangelo was born.