Miners Clash With Police by Don McPhee

Originally shot for The Guardian.

Miners and police clash, in what became known as the Battle of Orgreave. During late May and early June 1984, the Yorkshire coking plant, which was supplying fuel to Scunthorpe steel works, saw one of the bloodiest confrontations in an industrial dispute, when 5,000 pickets were confronted by a similar number of police, backed up by horses and dogs. Don McPhee/The Guardian

  • Framed / Mounted

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    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 160 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 425 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 79.166 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95.833 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 108.333 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 137.5 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Don McPhee

Don McPhee, Guardian photographer who sadly passed away in 2007 was an assured, confident photographer who knew the route he would take, and it would be a brave picture editor who tried to change it.

Don McPhee had the reputation of a consistent, competent photographer, who, once set a challenge would go about it with thoroughness that left others in his wake.

The catalogue of photography built by Don McPhee during his employment by the Guardian reveals Dons’ interest in people and politics.

Hic acute observations of those involved in the yearlong miners’ strike are a history lesson that need no words and his picture from Orgreave where the miners and the police fought a pitched battle has become iconic.

Don remembered the day: ‘Having driven over from Manchester, I missed being corralled into a pen the police had provided for the press. So, I joined the pickets and just wandered in with them and got the picture. Then I saw 30 horses galloping at me. It was like being at the wrong end of the Charge of the Light Brigade. I didn’t stop to take any more pictures – I just legged it.’

Those who worked with don McPhee refer to his comprehensive grasp and illustration of whatever challenge he was set.

In 2001 he was awarded an honorary MA from Manchester Metropolitan University and was a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, Don McPhee worked for the Guardian from 1971 to 2001.

About Denis Thorpe

Don McPhee, Guardian photographer who sadly passed away in 2007 was an assured, confident photographer who knew the route he would take, and it would be a brave picture editor who tried to change it.

Don McPhee had the reputation of a consistent, competent photographer, who, once set a challenge would go about it with thoroughness that left others in his wake.

The catalogue of photography built by Don McPhee during his employment by the Guardian reveals Dons’ interest in people and politics.

Hic acute observations of those involved in the yearlong miners’ strike are a history lesson that need no words and his picture from Orgreave where the miners and the police fought a pitched battle has become iconic.

Don remembered the day: ‘Having driven over from Manchester, I missed being corralled into a pen the police had provided for the press. So, I joined the pickets and just wandered in with them and got the picture. Then I saw 30 horses galloping at me. It was like being at the wrong end of the Charge of the Light Brigade. I didn’t stop to take any more pictures – I just legged it.’

Those who worked with don McPhee refer to his comprehensive grasp and illustration of whatever challenge he was set.

In 2001 he was awarded an honorary MA from Manchester Metropolitan University and was a fellow of the Royal Photographic Society, Don McPhee worked for the Guardian from 1971 to 2001.