Parole Drink by Thurston Hopkins

2nd May 1953: Nearing the end of a seven year sentence in Wakefield Gaol, Danny Hughes has been granted a week’s parole. Trusted to take responsibility for himself, Danny (left) enjoys some of the simple freedoms that he had been denied in prison. Original Publication: Picture Post – 6494 – Seven Days Leave – From Prison – pub. 1953 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

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    Silver Gelatin Prints

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    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 137.5 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 154.17 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 200 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 225 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 250 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 304.17 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 216.6666 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 295.83 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 345.83 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 375 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 516.6666 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 79.166 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 83.333 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 100 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 116.6666667 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 141.6666667 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 183.3333333 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 286.6666667 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 112.5 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 154.17 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 204.17 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 245.83 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 275 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 404.17 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 516.6666 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Thurston Hopkins

Thurston Hopkins was born in 1913 in Sleaford in Sussex and died in October 2014. As a younger man he was Godfrey Thurston Hopkins but dropped the Godfrey while at school.

He studied at Brighton College of Art and when he left, he found work as a graphic artist and later, after being made redundant he joined a news picture agency, PhotoPress.

He didn’t work for long in the cut throat business of news journalism and left to set up his own photography business in Brighton.

When the second world war came along, he joined and served with the RAF photography unit.
After the war Thurston Hopkins travelled around Europe, hitch hiking and taking photos with his newly acquired Leica camera, a souvenir of the war.

Cinema Queue by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

1955: John and Sheila Phillips queuing for tickets for the film ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’ in London. Original Publication was for  Picture Post – 8083 . This Photo taken by Thurston Hopkins.  ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’  was released in August 1955 and starred Rory Calhoun, Piper Laurie and Jack Carson. The plot according to IMDb is ”Rowdy young girl crashes high society when wealthy older man falls for her.”

Parole Drink by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

2nd May 1953: Nearing the end of a seven year sentence in Wakefield Gaol, Danny Hughes has been granted a week’s parole. Trusted to take responsibility for himself, Danny (left) enjoys some of the simple freedoms that he had been denied in prison. Original Publication: Picture Post – 6494 – Seven Days Leave – From Prison – pub. 1953 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

A street in Liverpool by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer. Thurston Hopkins Hulton Getty
Streets of Liverpool.Liverpool’s political leaders who objected to the depiction of Liverpool as a slum. Godfrey Thurston Hopkins worked for Picture Post from 1950 to 1957 until the magazine closed. Examples of Hopkin’s work are held by the V & A and MoMA in New York and by the Arts Council of Great Britain. Hopkins was married to photojournalist Grace Robertson and they lived happily together in Sussex until the death of Thurston Hopkins in 2014.

Handstand by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer.

A little boy doing a handstand in the road. Thurston Hopkins Street Children was very much part of the early social documentary style that formed a great deal of his work.

Children Of The Streets, was first published in 1954 in Picture Post. The Post became a publishing phenomenon. Throughout the war years, Picture Post was required reading in Britain – at times its ‘readership’ was reported at over 80% of the population. The magazine’s liberal, anti-Fascist, populist editorial stance, coupled with candid 35mm photography by a whole stable of extraordinarily talented photographers, was a runaway success.

 

Alfred Hitchcock by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

29th January 1955: British film director Alfred Hitchcock (1899 – 1980) known as the ‘Master of Suspense’ outside the British Museum in London. 1955 saw the release of his fiftieth movie To Catch a Thief a romantic thriller  based on the 1952 novel of the same name by David Dodge. The film stars Cary Grant as a retired cat burglar who has to save his reformed reputation by catching an imposter preying on the wealthy tourists of the French Riviera. Grace Kelly stars opposite him as his romantic interest in her final film with Hitchcock.1955 also marked the arrival of his television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents.Picture Post – 7499 – A Sinister Time Was Had By All – pub. 1955 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Gargoyle Clubbers by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer.

People dancing at the Gargoyle Club in Dean Street, Soho, London.The Gargoyle Club  opened in 1925 and has played host to such diverse names as Noel Coward and Marc Almond in its various guises over the years .

 it was last refurbished as the the Dean Street Townhouse hotel and restaurant and rumour is Dean Street Dining Room was the location of Prince Harry and  Meghan Markle’s first date.

Original Publication: Picture Post – 8593 – I Am the Queen Of Soho – pub. 1956 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Getty Images)

 

Pavilion Blur by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Pavilion Blur by Thurston Hopkins

8th August 1953: A blur of participants in the Holiday Girl Beauty Competition at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, East Sussex. Original Publication: Picture Post – 6655 – TV Takes A Holiday In Brighton : Brighton Belles – pub. 1953 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Exhausted Worker by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Cowman Joe Fry with his head in his hand after a twelve-hour shift at White Carr Farm, Kirkham, Lancashire. Original Publication: Picture Post – 7392 – The Men Who Never Strike – pub. 1954 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Getty Images)

Wedding Game by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

A girl wearing a wedding headdress in an area of Liverpool. This picture of children playing was taken on the 19th of November 1956. and destined for publication in Picture Post.However, it was never published for fear of upsetting Liverpool’s political leaders who objected to the depiction of Liverpool as a slum. Godfrey Thurston Hopkins worked for Picture Post from 1950 to 1957 until the magazine closed. Examples of Hopkin’s work are held by the V & A and MoMA in New York and by the Arts Council of Great Britain. Hopkins was married to photojournalist Grace Robertson and they lived happily together in Sussex until the death of Thurston Hopkins in 2014.

Sharing A Chair by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

12th February 1955: A young couple getting to know each other at the Manchester University Student Union Fresher’s Ball. The tradition of Fresher Week continues in university towns throughout the country. Freshers week in Manchester is usually in September and hundreds of students take to the streets in pursuit of friendships that may last a lifetime. (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Retuning to the UK he got a job with Camera Press a picture agency started in 1947 by Tom Blau and still a force in the picture agency business today.

Thurston Hopkins started work for Picture Post in 1950 and left in 1957. One of the first series of photos he undertook was ‘’Cats of London’’, an observation of the many homeless cats that populated London after the blitz.

A set of pictures taken in Liverpool in 1956 is considered by many to be his finest work. He photographed those living in the slums but the content showing the poverty, deprivation and misery was so disturbing that the publication of the pictures was prevented by Edward Hulton, the owner of Picture Post and the pictures were never published.

It was while he worked at Picture Post that he met and married Grace Robertson, in the 1950’s she was a rare thing, a female professional photographer. So rare that Grace determined to get work adopted a male pseudonym, Dick Muir, in the early part of her career to enable her to pursue the work she wanted.

When the Picture Post came to an end Hopkins set up a studio in Chiswick and became one of London’s most successful commercial photographers, He later returned to Brighton and taught photography at the Guildford College of Art.

About Thurston Hopkins

Thurston Hopkins was born in 1913 in Sleaford in Sussex and died in October 2014. As a younger man he was Godfrey Thurston Hopkins but dropped the Godfrey while at school.

He studied at Brighton College of Art and when he left, he found work as a graphic artist and later, after being made redundant he joined a news picture agency, PhotoPress.

He didn’t work for long in the cut throat business of news journalism and left to set up his own photography business in Brighton.

When the second world war came along, he joined and served with the RAF photography unit.
After the war Thurston Hopkins travelled around Europe, hitch hiking and taking photos with his newly acquired Leica camera, a souvenir of the war.

Exhausted Worker by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Cowman Joe Fry with his head in his hand after a twelve-hour shift at White Carr Farm, Kirkham, Lancashire. Original Publication: Picture Post – 7392 – The Men Who Never Strike – pub. 1954 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Getty Images)

Parole Drink by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

2nd May 1953: Nearing the end of a seven year sentence in Wakefield Gaol, Danny Hughes has been granted a week’s parole. Trusted to take responsibility for himself, Danny (left) enjoys some of the simple freedoms that he had been denied in prison. Original Publication: Picture Post – 6494 – Seven Days Leave – From Prison – pub. 1953 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

A street in Liverpool by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer. Thurston Hopkins Hulton Getty
Streets of Liverpool.Liverpool’s political leaders who objected to the depiction of Liverpool as a slum. Godfrey Thurston Hopkins worked for Picture Post from 1950 to 1957 until the magazine closed. Examples of Hopkin’s work are held by the V & A and MoMA in New York and by the Arts Council of Great Britain. Hopkins was married to photojournalist Grace Robertson and they lived happily together in Sussex until the death of Thurston Hopkins in 2014.

Cinema Queue by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

1955: John and Sheila Phillips queuing for tickets for the film ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’ in London. Original Publication was for  Picture Post – 8083 . This Photo taken by Thurston Hopkins.  ‘Ain’t Misbehavin’  was released in August 1955 and starred Rory Calhoun, Piper Laurie and Jack Carson. The plot according to IMDb is ”Rowdy young girl crashes high society when wealthy older man falls for her.”

Handstand by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer.

A little boy doing a handstand in the road. Thurston Hopkins Street Children was very much part of the early social documentary style that formed a great deal of his work.

Children Of The Streets, was first published in 1954 in Picture Post. The Post became a publishing phenomenon. Throughout the war years, Picture Post was required reading in Britain – at times its ‘readership’ was reported at over 80% of the population. The magazine’s liberal, anti-Fascist, populist editorial stance, coupled with candid 35mm photography by a whole stable of extraordinarily talented photographers, was a runaway success.

 

Pavilion Blur by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

Pavilion Blur by Thurston Hopkins

8th August 1953: A blur of participants in the Holiday Girl Beauty Competition at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, East Sussex. Original Publication: Picture Post – 6655 – TV Takes A Holiday In Brighton : Brighton Belles – pub. 1953 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Alfred Hitchcock by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

29th January 1955: British film director Alfred Hitchcock (1899 – 1980) known as the ‘Master of Suspense’ outside the British Museum in London. 1955 saw the release of his fiftieth movie To Catch a Thief a romantic thriller  based on the 1952 novel of the same name by David Dodge. The film stars Cary Grant as a retired cat burglar who has to save his reformed reputation by catching an imposter preying on the wealthy tourists of the French Riviera. Grace Kelly stars opposite him as his romantic interest in her final film with Hitchcock.1955 also marked the arrival of his television series Alfred Hitchcock Presents.Picture Post – 7499 – A Sinister Time Was Had By All – pub. 1955 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Sharing A Chair by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

12th February 1955: A young couple getting to know each other at the Manchester University Student Union Fresher’s Ball. The tradition of Fresher Week continues in university towns throughout the country. Freshers week in Manchester is usually in September and hundreds of students take to the streets in pursuit of friendships that may last a lifetime. (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Picture Post/Getty Images)

Wedding Game by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

A girl wearing a wedding headdress in an area of Liverpool. This picture of children playing was taken on the 19th of November 1956. and destined for publication in Picture Post.However, it was never published for fear of upsetting Liverpool’s political leaders who objected to the depiction of Liverpool as a slum. Godfrey Thurston Hopkins worked for Picture Post from 1950 to 1957 until the magazine closed. Examples of Hopkin’s work are held by the V & A and MoMA in New York and by the Arts Council of Great Britain. Hopkins was married to photojournalist Grace Robertson and they lived happily together in Sussex until the death of Thurston Hopkins in 2014.

Gargoyle Clubbers by Thurston Hopkins

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer.

People dancing at the Gargoyle Club in Dean Street, Soho, London.The Gargoyle Club  opened in 1925 and has played host to such diverse names as Noel Coward and Marc Almond in its various guises over the years .

 it was last refurbished as the the Dean Street Townhouse hotel and restaurant and rumour is Dean Street Dining Room was the location of Prince Harry and  Meghan Markle’s first date.

Original Publication: Picture Post – 8593 – I Am the Queen Of Soho – pub. 1956 (Photo by Thurston Hopkins/Getty Images)

 

Retuning to the UK he got a job with Camera Press a picture agency started in 1947 by Tom Blau and still a force in the picture agency business today.

Thurston Hopkins started work for Picture Post in 1950 and left in 1957. One of the first series of photos he undertook was ‘’Cats of London’’, an observation of the many homeless cats that populated London after the blitz.

A set of pictures taken in Liverpool in 1956 is considered by many to be his finest work. He photographed those living in the slums but the content showing the poverty, deprivation and misery was so disturbing that the publication of the pictures was prevented by Edward Hulton, the owner of Picture Post and the pictures were never published.

It was while he worked at Picture Post that he met and married Grace Robertson, in the 1950’s she was a rare thing, a female professional photographer. So rare that Grace determined to get work adopted a male pseudonym, Dick Muir, in the early part of her career to enable her to pursue the work she wanted.

When the Picture Post came to an end Hopkins set up a studio in Chiswick and became one of London’s most successful commercial photographers, He later returned to Brighton and taught photography at the Guildford College of Art.

Related Products

Anthony Gormley’s ‘Field’ by Andy Paradise

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer

British Artist Anthony Gormley and his work entitled ‘Field’ at the British Museum in 2002.

22 November 2002 by Andy Paradise

Will Carling by Pete Jenkins

Will Carling (England) Centre – Captain (Harlequins) outpacing the Welsh defence name: Will Carling (England) Centre – Captain (Harlequins)

Date: 6/2/1993 Event: Wales v England

location: Cardiff Arms Park, buy a photo, buy a picture, buy rugby picture, buy a picture of will carling Wales rugby Union, Cardiff Arms Park, buy a framed picture .sport. rugby,

Fun Fair Fun by Terry Fincher

Art of photojournalism limited editions for sale from the collections of Northcliffe and Hulton Getty and the Evening Standard. For sale as print c-type or giclee art for your wall for office or home. wall art.  framed pictures in quality frames. Delivered to your door. Each photo has a certificate and caption and a biography of the photographer.

1st June 1957: Sherree Danton, Pat Lawrence and Wendy Graham enjoying the wind machine at the opening of the Festival Gardens fun fair, Battersea Park, London. (Photo by Terry Fincher/Keystone/Getty Images)