Remains Of Guildhall by Herbert Mason

Sir George Wilkinson the Lord Mayor of London pictured examining the remains of Guildhall. The Guildhall in London  was bombed on December 29, 1940 by the German Luftwaffe. Most of the damage was caused by fire spreading from the City of London. Fire from the bombed St Jewry had drifted to the Guildhall’s roof and by ten ‘o’ clock the Great Hall’s roof was ablaze. Thirty minutes later the building had to be abandoned. Photograph by Herbert Mason.

  • Print Only

    From £95

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    Framed / Mounted

    From £192

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    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 192 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 510 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 115 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 130 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 165 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Herbert Mason

Herbert Mason 1903-1964

Born in 1903 in Great Yarmouth Herbert Mason was the son of Walter Mason, who ran a photography businesses on the seafront and worked for the Yarmouth Mercury.

He joined the Daily Mail in the 1930s as a news photographer covering all types of stories.

On the night of 29 December 1940, Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason was on fire watch on the roof of Northcliffe House in Fleet Street. He captured what became the defining image of the Blitz – St. Paul’s emerging defiantly from the smoke of surrounding burning buildings. The image appeared in the Daily Mail two days later under the headline ‘St. Paul’s Stands Unharmed in the Midst of the Burning City’. Ironically, only four weeks later, the photograph was reproduced by the Berliner Illustre Zeitung who used it not to show the resilience of the blitzed city, but to show that London was burning to the ground.

After the Blitz he became an official photographer in the Royal Navy sailing to Murmansk with Russian Convoys as well as Malta and Sicily.

He returned to the Mail after the war and became one of their chief photographers covering everything from the wedding of Angela Lansbury in 1949, to the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, and the conflict in Suez in 1956 as well as sporting events, fashion and the trial of Derek Bentley.

Mason worked for the Daily Mail right up to his death in 1964.

About Herbert Mason

Herbert Mason 1903-1964

Born in 1903 in Great Yarmouth Herbert Mason was the son of Walter Mason, who ran a photography businesses on the seafront and worked for the Yarmouth Mercury.

He joined the Daily Mail in the 1930s as a news photographer covering all types of stories.

On the night of 29 December 1940, Daily Mail photographer Herbert Mason was on fire watch on the roof of Northcliffe House in Fleet Street. He captured what became the defining image of the Blitz – St. Paul’s emerging defiantly from the smoke of surrounding burning buildings. The image appeared in the Daily Mail two days later under the headline ‘St. Paul’s Stands Unharmed in the Midst of the Burning City’. Ironically, only four weeks later, the photograph was reproduced by the Berliner Illustre Zeitung who used it not to show the resilience of the blitzed city, but to show that London was burning to the ground.

After the Blitz he became an official photographer in the Royal Navy sailing to Murmansk with Russian Convoys as well as Malta and Sicily.

He returned to the Mail after the war and became one of their chief photographers covering everything from the wedding of Angela Lansbury in 1949, to the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, and the conflict in Suez in 1956 as well as sporting events, fashion and the trial of Derek Bentley.

Mason worked for the Daily Mail right up to his death in 1964.