The Ribblehead Viaduct by Denis Thorpe

Originally shot for The Guardian.

Guardian Classic: Settle Carlisle Railway, Ribblehead Viaduct near Ribblesdale.

Photo by Denis Thorpe Date Taken: 1986

  • This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 30cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 160 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 425 £
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    (Rest of the World £35)

About Denis Thorpe

Denis Thorpe, a Guardian photojournalist between 1974 and 1996, quiet spoken and attentive to his environment. Always seeking the next picture. Camera in hand he would search the horizons like a predator seeking prey and when the prey was spotted Denis would then spend time stalking and waiting his moment to strike.

Denis started his fifty-year career with a typewriter,as a reporter, not a photographer, but went on to become one of the Guardians most celebrated photographers and spent his life working around Manchester for the newspaper he loved.

On assignment at Manchester City football ground the crowd announcer informed the 50,000 spectators crowd that today the game was being attended by Guardian photographer Denis Thorpe, such is his local standing.

The Guardian gave Denis an opportunity to be a witness to huge social change, to record local poverty, the end of the mining industry, riots in prisons and celebrities and stars such as Nureyev one of Denis’ favourite pictures taken on his beloved Leica.

This tiny sample of his work is described by the Guardian as Denis Thorpe classics. We can do no more than agree.

About Denis Thorpe

Denis Thorpe, a Guardian photojournalist between 1974 and 1996, quiet spoken and attentive to his environment. Always seeking the next picture. Camera in hand he would search the horizons like a predator seeking prey and when the prey was spotted Denis would then spend time stalking and waiting his moment to strike.

Denis started his fifty-year career with a typewriter,as a reporter, not a photographer, but went on to become one of the Guardians most celebrated photographers and spent his life working around Manchester for the newspaper he loved.

On assignment at Manchester City football ground the crowd announcer informed the 50,000 spectators crowd that today the game was being attended by Guardian photographer Denis Thorpe, such is his local standing.

The Guardian gave Denis an opportunity to be a witness to huge social change, to record local poverty, the end of the mining industry, riots in prisons and celebrities and stars such as Nureyev one of Denis’ favourite pictures taken on his beloved Leica.

This tiny sample of his work is described by the Guardian as Denis Thorpe classics. We can do no more than agree.