The Viking Sea by Roger Jackson

Fireworks over the Viking Sea, following her naming ceremony at Greenwich, London, Thursday, May 5, 2016.  The sophisticated, state-of-the-art ship cruise ship can host 930 guests on itineraries that start from Scandinavia and the Baltic through to the Western and Eastern Mediterranean as well as the Caribbean and beyond. Viking Sea is the second ocean cruise ship launched by Viking Cruises and follows the arrival into Greenwich last March of its sister ship, Viking Star.

  • This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 30cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 160 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 310 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 425 £
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    51cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    (Rest of the World £35)

About Roger Jackson

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

From my stint as a messenger boy I progressed through the company learning more about the mechanical process of photograph from print washing through to developing films/plates and printing pictures all the time taking pictures. An apprenticeship in all but name. If they were good enough Central Press (CP) would syndicate them for me on a 50/50 basis. At weekends I would work as a freelance photographer covering football matches and what are called media events these days. When the boss of CP, John Lacey, saw how much I was making as a freelance he gave me the opportunity to become one of their staff photographers covering everything from Royal Rota’s, politics, fashions, social events and every sort of sport. Just the sort of photograph a photo butterfly loves.

I stayed at CP until 1979 when I joined the Associated Press as a picture editor. My photography days took a back seat then as it was frowned upon for editors to be photographers as well. Strange when you consider that photographers are expected to multi task these days. Joining AP meant the chance to travel and so it was that I went to four Summer and Winter Olympics, five World Cup’s and Euro Championships plus Papal and US Presidential visits.

I retired from AP in 2009 and continue to use a camera still looking for that picture that will interest a newspaper picture desk. As an example the Viking Sea and fireworks picture was use in the Daily Telegraph across four columns this year. So by my reckoning I have been a published photographer for 55 years.

About Roger Jackson

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

I left school at 15 and started work in Fleet Street on Jan. 1st 1962 for Central Press Photo’s a Fleet St. photo agency who had offices at 6-7 Gough Sqr.

My first job there was as a messenger delivering prints to the picture desks of the National and provincial papers then on Fleet Street. Everything was done by hand then there was nothing called internet delivery in those days.

I was already a published photographer when I joined CP having had publications in local papers and a page of pictures in a photo paper. I was described as a photo butterfly in the article in the photo paper for the various images I has submitted and that has been my life as a photographer ever since taking pictures of all sorts of things.

From my stint as a messenger boy I progressed through the company learning more about the mechanical process of photograph from print washing through to developing films/plates and printing pictures all the time taking pictures. An apprenticeship in all but name. If they were good enough Central Press (CP) would syndicate them for me on a 50/50 basis. At weekends I would work as a freelance photographer covering football matches and what are called media events these days. When the boss of CP, John Lacey, saw how much I was making as a freelance he gave me the opportunity to become one of their staff photographers covering everything from Royal Rota’s, politics, fashions, social events and every sort of sport. Just the sort of photograph a photo butterfly loves.

I stayed at CP until 1979 when I joined the Associated Press as a picture editor. My photography days took a back seat then as it was frowned upon for editors to be photographers as well. Strange when you consider that photographers are expected to multi task these days. Joining AP meant the chance to travel and so it was that I went to four Summer and Winter Olympics, five World Cup’s and Euro Championships plus Papal and US Presidential visits.

I retired from AP in 2009 and continue to use a camera still looking for that picture that will interest a newspaper picture desk. As an example the Viking Sea and fireworks picture was use in the Daily Telegraph across four columns this year. So by my reckoning I have been a published photographer for 55 years.