All images from the Evening Standard are limited to 300 prints only. Each certificate issued will also display your unique edition number.

Wimbledon Common by Alex Lentati

As the cold weather continues dramatic sunsets are created on Wimbledon Common in South West London by Alex Lentati

  • Print Only

    From £95

    • £
    Framed / Mounted

    From £192

    • £

    This is Classique, at its longest edge the print will be 35.5 cm long with an overall length of 51cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 192 £

    This is Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm long with an overall length of 77cm framed.

    It is printed on Fuji Lustre photographic paper and will have a white mount surround with solid wood frame.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Forté, at its longest edge the print will be 60cm and floats on the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 372 £

    This is Alu-Grandé, at its longest edge the print will be 90cm and floats above the surface of your wall.

    It is printed directly onto aluminium with a super glossy finish and comes with mountings.

    • 510 £
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    51cm X 41.5cm
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge
    77cm longest edge

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 95 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 115 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 130 £

    At Fleet Street's Finest we sell C-Type prints and Alumini ChromaLuxe. Digital C-Type photographic prints use similar exposure techniques to 'dark room' analogue developing techniques but without the need for a negative.

    Equally the enlarging, focusing and exposure to the paper is managed by a computer using lasers or LEDs rather than a bulb. The following process is still very much the same with the paper being processed in chemical developer, followed by a bleech fix before a wash to remove the processing chemicals.

    A C-Type print very much has its origins in traditional photographic processes but is originated from a digital file rather than a negative. Though, obviously, some of our vintage images are from scans of negatives.

    • 165 £

    (Rest of the World £40)


    (Rest of the World £15)

About Alex Lentati

Alex Lentati has a passion for showing Evening Standard readers what’s actually happening in London. For over thirty years he has covered notable events, revealed through his pictures the inner characters of celebrities and, most of all, reflected the lives of Londoners in all their variety.

Big events have shown his resourcefulness. A rarely used service door led him to get the only immediate pictures of the Kings Cross fire aftermath. A tip-off led him to picture the early morning police raid on the home of Jamie Blandford, now the Duke of Marlborough.

Alex’s rapport with people comes through in his work. He took an iconic wistful picture of Princess Diana just days after the impending divorce was announced. We see Jeremy Corbyn juggling oranges, the late actor known to many as the original Dumbledore, Richard Harris stumbling out of the Savoy fire in his dressing gown, a young Leonardo de Caprio days after the release of Titanic and the great singer song writer the late Lou Reed on tour in London.

It’s not just celebrities that make compelling shots. His work with everyday people and places is what he likes best. “I always try to show what’s happening – the joys, sorrows, disasters and triumphs of everyday Londoners,” he said.

About Alex Lentati

Alex Lentati has a passion for showing Evening Standard readers what’s actually happening in London. For over thirty years he has covered notable events, revealed through his pictures the inner characters of celebrities and, most of all, reflected the lives of Londoners in all their variety.

Big events have shown his resourcefulness. A rarely used service door led him to get the only immediate pictures of the Kings Cross fire aftermath. A tip-off led him to picture the early morning police raid on the home of Jamie Blandford, now the Duke of Marlborough.

Alex’s rapport with people comes through in his work. He took an iconic wistful picture of Princess Diana just days after the impending divorce was announced. We see Jeremy Corbyn juggling oranges, the late actor known to many as the original Dumbledore, Richard Harris stumbling out of the Savoy fire in his dressing gown, a young Leonardo de Caprio days after the release of Titanic and the great singer song writer the late Lou Reed on tour in London.

It’s not just celebrities that make compelling shots. His work with everyday people and places is what he likes best. “I always try to show what’s happening – the joys, sorrows, disasters and triumphs of everyday Londoners,” he said.